Lives in the Yiddish Theatre
SHORT BIOGRAPHIES OF THOSE INVOLVED IN THE Yiddish THEATRE
aS DESCRIBED IN zALMEN zYLBERCWEIG'S "lEKSIKON FUN YIDISHN TEATER"

1931-1969
 

Meir Akselrad

Born in 1902 in Molodetshna, White Russia, very early, he was attracted to painting. At the age of eighteen, for the firs time, he attended a picture gallery in Smolesk, and there he began to study in the local studio. In 1921 he also participated then by entering into a art high school, were he learned with Vladimir Povarsky, graduating from the institute. There he remained as a teacher. Then he took to traveling across Russia. In 1933 he lived in the Jewish colonies of Kherson Gubernia, and he created everywhere, among his pictures were also five ghetto scenes: "In letstn veg," "In a baheltnish," "In fashistishn lager," "A familye" and "Zkin froyen, kinder."

In the span of many years, he illustrated the work of Peretz, Sholem Aleichem, Bergelson, Kvitko, Lurie et al.

Together with Annie Charik, M. translated the play, "Truadek" for the "Moscow Jewish State Theatre."

A. also created the sets for Bergelson's "Mids hdin," and Sholem Aleichem's "Dos farkhishufte shnayderl."

Shlomo Rabinowitz writes:

"Meir Akselrad constantly remains an artist, who feels sharply the pulse of life. About this witnesses say that the exhibition, she consists of work from various themes, from various genres, from various characters. In them is to see the next and today, human passion and joy from life. This shock in Fascist hell, and the beauty of Velder and Felder [?], creativity and struggle for peace in the world."

  • "Izi kharik," 1936, p. 136.

  • Shlomo Rabinowitz -- Baym kinstler meir akselrad, "Morgn frayhayt," N.Y, 10 Oct. 1968.


 

 

 

 


 

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Adapted from the original Yiddish text found within the  "Lexicon of the Yiddish Theatre" by Zalmen Zylbercweig, Volume 7, page 6216.
 

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