THE MUSEUM OF FAMILY HISTORY presents

A Multitude of Immigrants
AMERICAN NEWSPAPERS AND HOW THEY ADDRESSED THE IMMIGRATION ISSUE

 

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From The World newspaper, Thursday Evening, May 21, 1903:

SOME OF THE 6,000 IMMIGRANTS WHO SWARMED INTO PORT TO-DAY,
BEING LANDED AT THE RECEPTION PIER ON ELLIS ISLAND.


Immigrants Landing at Ellis Island.

IMMIGRANTS LANDING IN NEW YORK AT ELLIS ISLAND.
 

 

6,0000 SUFFER IN STEERAGES


Harbor Crowded with New Arrivals, Who Are Held Up in Stifling Weather, Owing to Ellis Island Crush.


ONE SHIP BREAKS RECORD.


Pennsylvania Carries More Steerage Passengers than Were Ever Brought Here on a Liner Before
--Most of the Immigrants Booked for West.


More than 6,000 immigrants are about the harbor of New York to-day, i the stifling atmosphere of the steerage, awaiting their discharge by the immigration authorities. Of this number nearly half are on the Pennsylvania, which arrived from Hamburg to-day with 2,728 steerage passengers. This is the largest number brought in by a single ship in two years.

A few weeks ago 2,594 steerage passengers arrived on one boat, and several ships have carried as high as 1,800 steerage passengers, but the record for the past two years was made to-day when the Pennsylvania came past Quarantine and reported all well to the doctor, who went over her side to inquire after the health of those on board.

All these passengers have been aboard the big liners for from eight to ten days. The crowded condition of their quarters during the hot spell caused great suffering, particularly to the women and children. The slight breezes stirred up by the motion of the ships helped a little to keep the air of the steerages in motion, but with the big liners at a standstill down the bay the steerages become reeking ovens.

Men crowded about the hatchways and women sat with gasping children fanning them in vain efforts to give them comfort. Over all there was an air of unrest. There were the ill temper and complaints that come with a hot, stuffy day.

While the condition on the Pennsylvania was a trifle worse and more unpleasant than that on the other ships, because of the number of passengers she carried, everything was done to make it as agreeable as possible until the immigrants were landed on Ellis Island.

These big ships brought in steerage passengers to add to the crush at Ellis Island yesterday: Majestic 550, Attivita 481, Aurania 1,100, Gera 920.

By this evening the authorities expect to have all the immigrants properly attended to. The last boats to leave the island to-day probably will carry most of those who arrived to-day to various railroad stations, as the majority of those who arrived are scheduled to go West.

The Pennsylvania also brought two camels and a number of birds and dogs.

Carl Gebhard, a second cabin passenger, died of heart disease and was buried at sea. His home was at Hamburg, Germany.

Among the cabin passengers were three children of Dr. O'Brien, the American dentist, who was mentioned in connection with the Princess Louise elopement. Other passengers were Henry Bonnewell, Forbes Morgan, F. C. Lawrence, Rev. C. A. Marshall and Milton Erwin.
 

 

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